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Auto – Bentley will switch to freight machines in the event of a hard Brexit

The luxury car manufacturer Bentley from Great Britain wants to transport body parts with freight machines from the mainland in the event of a hard Brexit. This is to avoid delivery bottlenecks.

The luxury car maker Bentley wants to switch to air transport if necessary in order to avoid delivery bottlenecks in the event of a disorderly EU exit. The British VW subsidiary had booked Antonov freight machines for this, said CEO Adrian Hallmark at an event of the “Financial Times”.

“We planned for two years. We have five Antonovs that we have in reserve to fly bodies to Manchester.” The replenishment of components should also be secured in this way.

An Antonov An-225 (symbol): Bentley intends to use such jets to overcome delivery bottlenecks. (Source: imago images / UPI Photo)An Antonov An-225: Bentley wants to use this type of jet to overcome delivery bottlenecks. (Source: UPI Photo / imago images)

So far, Bentley has worked with just-in-time production with a stock of two days. Now the reserves have been expanded to 14 working days. Bentley is thus securing production for three weeks.

Demand for luxury cars is increasing

In order to be prepared for bottlenecks in traditional delivery routes, the company has also rented additional warehouses. Bentley sources 90 percent of its components from the European continent and sells almost a quarter of its cars to Europe.

Should the EU fail to negotiate a trade deal with the UK, the carmaker would be able to offset the ten percent import tariffs through price increases and savings, Hallmark said. This would be less harmful than supply bottlenecks.

Bentley has set itself the goal of delivering 10,000 cars this year and is aiming for breakeven. The carmaker is benefiting above all from the recovery in China. But the demand for luxury cars is also increasing in Europe and the USA.

In 2019, the VW subsidiary was back in the black after losses in the previous year. With sales of around 11,000 copies, the British earned 65 million euros.

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