Real Estate

Property search: How to convince real estate agents and landlords

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Anyone who has ever looked for an apartment in a big city knows what desperation is. High rents are a problem. Often, however, prospective tenants do not even make it onto the shortlist for an apartment. Instead, they run from one viewing to the next, only to receive one rejection after another. Even an above-average income is no longer a guarantee of standing out from the crowd. But there are a few tricks with which realtors and landlords who are looking for an apartment can be positively remembered – and win the race for the dream apartment.

# 1 Convince with personality

If you discover an interesting advertisement, you have to be quick. Advertisements are often only online for a few hours, especially in sought-after locations. But be careful: Interested parties must not be careless in the sheer hurry. The e-mail to the landlord should be grammatically correct and contain no spelling mistakes and should contain more content than just asking about the viewing appointment. For landlords, the financial situation of the potential tenant is particularly important. The information that the interested party has a regular income should therefore not be missing in any email. It is also advisable to tell a few sentences about yourself. How do you currently live? Why do you want to move? Why would this apartment be exactly the right one? This is the only way for landlords to get a feel for the people who want to move into the apartment.

# 2 Serious demeanor

In principle, apartment tours work like castings or job interviews. The landlord lets all interested parties call in once and at the end selects the person who made the best impression. With the right demeanor, applicants can score points right from the start – or catapult themselves straight out of the box. Basically: Applicants should be punctual, polite and well-groomed. A suit and tie are not necessary. But if you come to the tour with perforated jeans and a cigarette butt in hand, you shouldn’t be surprised if a rejection flutters into your email inbox three days later.

# 3 Bring your application folder

A successful appearance on the tour is also the result of thorough preparation. Interested parties should collect all the important information in an application folder and give it to the landlord at the end of the tour. In the folder belong the last three salary statements, a tenant self-assessment and an excerpt from the Schufa. Landlords have no legal claim to this information, tenants may even refuse to provide information. If there are 50 interested parties, the owner will usually choose the one who has voluntarily pulled out.

# 4 Asking the right questions

Applicants who shyly chase after the landlord and only occasionally say “very nice” will hardly stand out from the crowd. Interested parties should take the opportunity to ask questions. Who else lives in the house? Are there any special rules that you should follow when living with your neighbors? Caution: If you ask too critically, you risk that the landlord will choose an applicant who appears more satisfied.

# 5 Reinforce interest

After the inspection, the hope and fear begin. Did you succeed in convincing the landlord? Will the long-awaited promise come? Especially when the response is a long time coming, many applicants itches in their fingers to pick up the phone and ask whether the landlord has already decided. However, this quickly becomes intrusive and is therefore usually not a good idea. Better: thank you for the tour by email and emphasize how much you liked the apartment. If in doubt, no one will be remembered by the landlord during the visit. Then a sympathetic thank you email can open the door to your dream apartment.

Real estate compass

Real estate compass

Current real estate prices and detailed maps for all residential areas in Germany can be found in the Personal-Financial.com Real Estate Compass: immobilien-kompass.Personal-Financial.com

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