Sectors

Heineken brews green | MarketingTribune Food and Retail

Since 2010, the brewer has been working on its global sustainable ambition “Brewing a Better World”, by, among other things, reducing the CO2 emissions of the breweries. In line with this ambition, windmills and large quantities of solar panels have been installed. In addition, the use of biogas was started in 2018 and is now fully operational.

Our ultimate goal is to be fully circular in the Netherlands by 2030 with breweries that are completely climate neutral.

Hans Böhm, General Manager Heineken Netherlands: “With our worldwide ‘Brewing a Better World’ ambition, we are making the chain and our products more sustainable step-by-step. Our ultimate goal is to be fully circular in the Netherlands by 2030 with breweries that are completely climate neutral. Recently, we have been able to take many great steps, for example by further upscaling biogas and solar energy. I am proud that I can now say that we have been brewing our mother brand Heineken for the Dutch consumer with 100% green energy since last month. This applies to all product and packaging variants that fall under the Heineken brand in the Dutch market, including Heineken 0.0. “

Beer from hops, yeast, water, wind and sun

Both the thermal and electrical energy used in the brewery for beer production and the packaging lines for all beer for the Dutch consumer is generated sustainably. This is about three million hectoliters of beer per year. The green energy consists of solar energy, wind energy and biogas from waste treatment. Biogas is extracted from the waste water from the breweries in Zoeterwoude and Den Bosch and supplemented with biogas from the waste treatment plant at the Aa en Maas Water Board. “We really see green energy as an indispensable new ingredient in our beer. Wind and sun are just as important as hops, water and yeast. The use of sustainable energy literally makes Heineken even greener. But our ambition goes further, the next step is to make our packaging materials more sustainable in the short term and to further close the cycle of materials in the Netherlands, “says Böhm.

Tags

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close
Close