Economy & Politics

Fear of job loss is gaining ground

Nearly a quarter of residents feel that the covid-19 crisis makes them more vulnerable on the job market. Greater fear for the generation of 35-54 year olds, says the latest Statec study.

Patrick JACQUEMOT

Patrick JACQUEMOT

Nearly a quarter of residents feel that the covid-19 crisis makes them more vulnerable on the job market. Greater fear for the generation of 35-54 year olds, says the latest Statec study.

There is what economists see. Public expenditure going crescendo, unemployment which jumps up, a recourse to new partial unemployment, companies requesting more and more state aid. And then there is the shock wave invisible that the covid-19 crisis generated on the morale of Luxembourgers. It is this impact that Statec has measured in recent weeks. And it emerges that, for 25% of residents, the feeling of job insecurity worsened.

In 2015, a similar study carried out on a European scale had however indicated how much the residents of Luxembourg had confidence in the future of their professional situation. Barely 11% of them then recognize an uncertainty. No doubt, beyond health fear, the fragility of social development is therefore increasing. And this feeling, notes the statistical institute is more particularly developed among those who have seen their working time decrease during these last weeks.


Soziale Isolation, Angst, Ungewissheit: Die aktuelle Situation ist für die einen schwerer zu ertragen als für andere. Die Forscher wollen herausfinden, welche Faktoren dabei eine Rolle spielen.

Social distancing, fear, uncertainty … Researchers at the University of Luxembourg are trying to find out how this exceptional situation can affect the mental health of the population. With one objective: that of better supporting those affected, but also helping politicians in their decision-making.


Thus, Statec finds that the more people have experienced either an extended period of work at home, or a severe reduction in the number of hours worked, the less they feel reassured about their future.

The level of education plays also on this feeling of fragility in pursuing a career under the same conditions. Thus, respondents with a secondary (45.1%) or tertiary (36.4%) level of education are those who are most in doubt now.

It turns out that 60% of residents fearing for their future professional are people in employment, 25% having had to submit to partial unemployment measures. If fear has an equal impact on men and women interviewed, the investigators highlighted differences in approach, depending on the nationality of origin of the respondents. So the notion of job insecurity more affects nationals of Luxembourg than citizens of French and Portuguese origin.

The study also highlights the negative consequences that this feeling of uncertainty can have on citizens. Do not hesitate to recall that job insecurity has consequences on the well-being of individuals: decrease in the health of an employee, increase in absenteeism, less professional engagement which, in turn, may result in a decline in organizational performance.

Statec economist Francesco Sarracino even recalls that, according to a previous study by the analysis company Gallup, “the chances of hiring in the workplace decrease by 37% among employees who are not sure of the stability of their jobs”. The loss of confidence resulting in the devaluation of individual skills that are perceived by a potential employer.


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